The Three Types: Dreamers, Doers and Achievers

What kind of people are you surrounded with: the dreamers, doers or achievers? A simple model which I sketched to explain and understand people better:

Three Types

Who are the dreamers?

These are the types who can talk. Those who want to learn to read music today and a foreign language tomorrow, but their desire to accomplish these never translate into meaningful action.

Favourite Quote:

“I think, therefore I am.” — René Descartes

Who are the doers?

These are the butt of people’s jokes. These are the crazy ones who think different, stay different. They never lose sight of the fact that the only thing which sets them apart from other millions is they think and they do. And they don’t give up easily.

Favourite Quote:

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” — Gandhi

Who are the achievers?

These are the types who never, never give up; those who dream and do and are successful, but still manage to stay hungry, foolish and humble!

Favourite Quote:

“Sometimes, if you aren’t sure about something, you have to just jump off the bridge and grow wings on your way down.” — Danielle Steel

Note: See the context here on Quora.

The brands that survive will be the brands that make life better

The brands that survive will be the brands that make life better

How to make a brand stand out from the crowd?

Co.Exist editor, Morgan Clendaniel, writes that companies that aren’t making a difference—to the world and to consumers—aren’t going to be around much longer. Instead of just making your product incrementally better than the competitor, you need to create impact. If you want to build a powerful brand, make people’s lives—and the world—better and more meaningful.

Also read three keys for moving beyond branding and into storytelling.

Social advertising — is it worth your advertising money?

The truth about social advertising and how to get more for your spending:

It pains me to see how a great idea is being crushed under the weight of unsympathetic brand managers. It is sad when you’ve to cook up feel-good stories when the original idea—if executed right— could produce real, outstanding results.

Key to Social Advertising

Social advertising isn’t for people looking for short-term goals. If the primary focus of your social advertising campaign is your brand, but not the social cause which you pretend to espouse, you shouldn’t expect your advertising money to produce the kind of results that you want. A brand can’t leverage from the social advertising if it fails to bring out the merits of the original idea—which is often the case with brands that solely focus on chasing that magic number.

Social advertising is worth your advertising money if your goal is to build long-term relationships with the people who buy your products. The truth is that social advertising isn’t advertising per se. We should think of social advertising as philanthropy or genuine CSR, and then make our campaign strategies accordingly. We shouldn’t be afraid to project the people who buy our product as the heroes of our social advertising campaign. If they aren’t the real heroes of your campaign, it’s unlikely that your brand would emerge as the winner.